Title

Global Cultural Identity: An Examination of Bicultural and Hybrid Self-concept through Priming

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication/Presentation Date

2011

Academic Year

2010-2011

Abstract/Description

People internalize globalization in different ways, depending on their exposure. Some argue for the existence of a bicultural identity in which people hold two sometimes conflicting, self-identities (global and local) that become more or less salient in different situations, whereas others argue for the existence of a hybrid identity in which people combine their local identity with elements of a global culture. Here, we compared two Western, democratic, free market economies, that differed in their exposure to global culture. Germans, who had greater exposure to global cultural flows, were more likely to have a hybrid identity, whereas Australians, who had less exposure to global cultural flows, were more likely to have a bicultural identity. When the global or local self was primed, Australians felt and acted in a manner consistent with the activated meaning system, whereas Germans felt and acted in a similar manner, regardless of the priming. Additionally, when taking into the role of subjective norms, both groups were influenced by those important to them.

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