Title

Young Adults in the United States and Benin Reason About Gendered Cultural Traditions

Document Type

Article

Publication/Presentation Date

11-2016

Academic Year

2017-18

Abstract/Description

Abstract: This study explored emerging and young adults' reasoning about cultural practices in West Africa. American (Study 1, n=78, M=20.76 years) and Beninese (Study 2, n=93, M=23.61 years) undergraduates were surveyed about their evaluations of corporal punishment, scarification, and schooling restrictions in conditions where the practices had gender-neutral or gender-specified targets. In Study 1, the majority (69%) of American participants negatively evaluated the practices, especially when targets were female. However, the majority (73%) assumed the cultural practices were consensual. In Study 2, the majority (76%) of Beninese participants negatively evaluated the practices, and their evaluations did not vary by gender of the target. Few (10%) Beninese participants assumed the cultural practices were consensual. In both studies, emerging and young adults who initially judged practices positively changed their evaluations with a change in consent.

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